Joel Aron: An Obsession for Perfection & a Passion for Portraits

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10 comments

  • What a beautiful series of portraits, an enormous shame though, what brought them to existence. Hope all those people were able to find new work.

  • As one of the many who stood before Joel in those tough days, I can assure you that his portraits mean a tremendous amount to all of those whom he photographed. Speaking of the power of social media, I think it’s a stunning tribute to Joel’s work that, in the days following his Lucasfilm portrait sessions, it seemed as if every single former-Lucas employee had changed their Facebook Profile photo and/or Cover Photo to be that of Joel’s portraiture. Joel’s portraits became a beautiful badge of honor that we all wore as we said goodbye to each other and commiserated.

  • The portraits and background story simply perfect.
    A good eye, a working concept, basic tools all working to a perfection.A difficult assignment.
    The 50mm Summicron a perfect fit for portraits.
    A 90mm makes one stand too far away.
    One needs to allow the subject space to breathe!
    Ages ago, i stopped shooting “heads on a stick” head-shots.
    Curious! Were the photographs made into a book?
    Thank you for sharing.jason.

  • Thank you all so much for the kind words about my co-workers and the images. 🙂

    There’ve been a few questions here, and to me personally about the lighting setup and how these were all shot. In the second part of this interview, I do discuss that a bit. I can tell ya briefly now.. it was as simple as you can imagine. Single light.

    So happy that these images were so well received. It’s truly an honor to have this body of my work represented here on the Leica Blog. If there are any questions that you have, please feel free to ask. 🙂

    -joel

  • This is a wonderful body of work & inspiring back story, too. Thanks for sharing your experiences with photography – it motivates me to do what I keep trying to do; carry my camera everywhere & find my ‘voice’.

    Also, nice to hear of a photographer who has the dominant left-eye problem, too! 😉

    Thank you for sharing your story.

  • It’s a shame you guys are showing meaningless work. There is no meaning behind these portraits. This shows no emotion or direction towards the parting of their jobs. I know you guys are getting good stories in. Find something with some real emotion and post it.

  • Interesting read, of course it is a sad story and I do really hope all these people can find a new satisfying job soon. i find the third photo very intense: the man is not looking at the camera, at the viewer and we do not know what is he looking at. Maybe at his uncertain future. I find there is a kind of tension in this photograph. But I like the other photos as well, the first the girl keeps her arms in an almost protective position and the last one where the man seems really to be facing his future. For sure you did a good job, unfortunately out from a bad situation. Just my thinking, ciao
    robert

  • An interesting read, of course it is a sad story and I do really hope all these people can find a new satisfying job soon. i find the third photo very intense: the man is not looking at the camera, at the viewer and we do not know what is he looking at. Maybe at his uncertain future. I find there is a kind of tension in this photograph.
    I find the other photos interesting as well, the girl in the first with her arms in an introverted gesture, a defensive position and the man in the last photo facing his future. I think you did a great job, unfortunately from a bad situation.
    robert

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